It's all happening today

Posted by Anton Hughes on Monday, April 25, 2005 with No comments
Just Do IP's newsletter today is full of software patent developments (and other interesting stuff which is related to my topic):

INDIA: LEFT PARTIES CLAIM VICTORY IN REFINING PATENTS ACT AMENDMENTS

 The section of the recently amended India Patents Act (1970) pertaining to computer programs has been revoked, according to the Free Software Foundation of India (FSF). The FSF notes that strong opposition to the amendment from the Left Parties played a key part in its revocation. However, FSF warns that, "unfortunately, we have come to know that the Indian Patent Office has issued a few patents relating to computer programs, in contravention of the provisions of Section 3 of the Patents Act, 1970, that should be revoked and cancelled. We request that necessary action and steps may be taken in this regard to avoid any issues under such patents." No software patenting was one of the main areas that the Left Parties campaigned against in the amended Act. Other areas included no ever-greening of patents, restoration of pre-grant opposition to patents, continued manufacture of mailbox drugs, and strengthening compulsory licensing provisions. The Left claims that it has either achieved deletions, modifications or restorations regarding all of these issues.
 Source:

UK: OPEN SOURCE METHODS TO IMPACT ON MANY AREAS

 UK based think-tank Demos has released a report entitled "Wide Open: Open source methods and their future potential," in which it maintains that the principles of open source are likely to have a transforming impact on many areas of business, government and daily life. The report concludes that a wide range of fields could be revolutionised by open source methods and that the future potential of open source principles are wide reaching. Areas where open source principles could be applied include the media, academia, policymaking, and social innovation. The report's author, Geoff Mulgan writes, "As has happened with the web - those cities, organisations and nations that move fastest to embrace open methods are likely to benefit in all sorts of ways - economic, social and cultural. There is also a deep political and moral imperative to make the most of open methods since they are one of the most important ways to make a reality of such much-abused words as empowerment." The report can be downloaded in full here.
 Source: Demos Press Release, Apr 20, 2005

US: APPLE'S CHIEF PATENT COUNSEL URGES PATENT REFORM

 Delivering testimony on behalf of the software industry before a US Subcommittee, Richard J. Lutton, Jr., Chief Patent Counsel for Apple, urged that patent reform was needed to advance the quality of patents issued by the USPTO and to also alleviate "the disruptive effects and uncertainty that excessive patent litigation now poses." According to the Business Software Association (BSA), "a periodic review and recalibration of the patent law is essential if patents are to remain a part of technological progress." To access the testimony, click here.
 Source: BSA Media Release, Apr 20, 2005

US: PROPOSAL WOULD CHANGE DEFINITION OF PRIOR ART

 A US House of Representatives working draft of patent legislation by Marcus Thymian, Jennifer Swartz, and Dennis Crouch proposes to expand the definition of qualifying prior art in 35 U.S.C. Section 102. This proposal involves eliminating the 12-month grace period, except in the case where public access of the invention was disclosed (directly or indirectly) by the inventor. To access the Draft Patent Statute, click here.
 Source: Patently-O: Patent Law Blog, Apr 17, 2005

US: NANOTECHNOLOGY PATENTS ARENA "COMPLEX AND FRAGMENTED"

 US inventors are rushing to register nanotechnology patents in their thousands, a new report by Lux Research has found. At the end of March 2005, 3,818 US nanotechnology patents had been issued with another 1,777 patent applications awaiting examination. Lux Research warns that, "the patent landscape for these materials is complex and fragmented. Because so many patents have been filed relating to nanomaterials, and so many of them seem to overlap, companies that want to use these building blocks in products will be forced to license patents from many different sources in order to do so."
 Source:

Categories: ,